Curriculum vitae

 

Research

 

Teaching activity

 

Publications

 

 

Thesis

 

 

Software

 

DICA  People  Alberto Bellin

Page last updated: 14/10/2005

Dica - People
Alberto Bellin

 

Position in DICA

Head
Full professor
Contact Information
Telephone: +39 0461 88.2601 - 2620
Fax: +39 0461 882672
Office: DICA 309
Email: Alberto.Bellin@ing.unitn.it
 
Curriculum vitae
Research
Teaching activity

Publications
Thesis
Software

Curriculum vitae

EDUCATION

Dottorato di Ricerca (Doctoral degree) in Fluid Mechanics at the University of Padua, Italy, 1992
Laurea (C.E.) in Hydraulic Engineering, University of Padua, Italy, 1987

EMPLOYMENT RECORD

Full professor, Faculty of Engineering, University of Trento, Italy, September 1, 2000- present
Associate professor, Faculty of Engineering, University of Trento, Italy, November 1, 1998- August 31, 2000
Researcher, Faculty of Engineering, University of Trento, Italy , November 1990 - October 1998
Post Doc Position at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (sabbatical year ) June 1992- July 1993 and June-July, 1994.

Research

NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

The objective of this research is the study of the mechanisms underlying transport of contaminants originating from diffused agricultural practices. The focus is on the contamination of surface and subsurface water bodies caused by fertilizations practices and pesticide treatments in agricultural districts. Models were proposed to simulate solute transport at the basin scale. This research was conducted in cooperation with Andrea Rinaldo, University of Padua and Alessandro Marani, University of Venice


TRANSPORT OF SOLUTES BY GROUNDWATER

1. Non-reactive Solutes

Transport of contaminants in groundwater is dominated by formation heterogeneities which are related to the long term variability of the geological processes underlying the aquifer formation. The research focuses on conservative solutes which are dissolved and transported by the water of the hydrological cycle without exchanging mass with the solid matrix. The main objective is to assess the impact of formation heterogeneities on transport. Strong heterogeneities and measurement scarsity call for a stochastic representation which assumes the hydraulic conductivity- the physical quantity controlling the formation attitude to convey water- as a Random Space Function. As a consequence velocities and solute concentrations are RSFs as well. Accurate numerical simulations have been performed in order to validate existing analytical results removing the simplifying assumptions. Models have also been proposed to avoid the solution of the flow equation as required in the classic finite difference and finite element approaches, thus alleviating the computational burden associated with the inversion of huge matrices resulting from the fine discretization grid required for the accurate representation of the velocity field. Other contributions are the study of the impact on transport of flow non-uniformities as those induced by the recharge and the seasonal variability of the mean (regional) water table and with the study of flow and transport in evolving scale formations.

2. Reactive Solutes

This research deals with transport of reactive solutes in heterogeneous porous formations. It applies then to solutes that exchange mass with the solid matrix. The mass exchange is a complex phenomenon controlled by several parameters as the organic matter content and the soil pH. Experimental evidence shows that in analogy with the hydraulic properties, those parameters are highly variable in space. Flow and transport of linearly equilibrium reactive solutes in physically and chemically heterogeneous environments have been analyzed analytically and numerically. Other contributions concern with the transport of non-linear equilibrium and kinetically sorbing solutes in heterogeneous formations.

Andrea Rinaldo and Paolo Salandin from the University of Padua, Yoram Rubin from the University of California at Berkeley, Sjoerd ATM van der Zee and Willem J. Bosma from the Univerity of Wageningen, Aldo Fiori from the Third University of Rome and Marilena Pannone from the University of Basilicata were involved to different extents (see the list of publications) in these researches.


SYNTHETIC GENERATION OF RANDOM SPACE FUNCTIONS

The availability of fast and accurate generators for random fields with correlated properties is crucial in addressing numerically several geophysical phenomena as solute transport in subsurface environments . This research aims at developing a methodology that uses a geostatistical approach to generate unconditional and conditional to measurements Random Space Functions. The methodology is organized in an efficient algorithm that minimizes the computation cost associated with the generation of many realizations of conditional or unconditional RSFs. The methodology is accurate and efficient in reproducing a large variety of RSFs showing single or evolving scale properties. The proposed algorithm is organized in a computer code available via ftp and named Hydro_gen. Downloading instructions as well as a brief description of the program can be obtained clicking on: HYDRO_GEN. This research has been developed in cooperation with Yoram Rubin, University of California, Berkeley.


STABILITY OF SPILLWAY STILLING BASINS

This research focuses on the definition of a design criterion for the slabs at the bottom of spillway stilling basins. The damage of chutes and spillway basins occurred at the Tarbela and Karnafuli dams have clearly highlighted the technical relevance of the correct prediction of the maximum instantaneous uplift force produced by turbulent pressure fluctuations acting on the protection slabs

The first part of the research, developed at the Hydraulic Laboratory of the University of Trento (Italy), focuses on the experimental validation of a stability criterion proposed in the literature which relies on the experimental determination of a reduction coefficient relating the maximum uplift force with the difference between the maximum positive and negative pressure fluctuations respect to the mean and to the inflowing velocity head. The reduction coefficient depends on the slab shape while characteristic values of the maximum pressure fluctuations can be found in the literature. The reduction coefficient is computed measuring simultaneously the global fluctuating uplift force and the pressure fluctuations on the slabs for Froude numbers of the incident flow ranging from 5 to 12.

The second part of the research, developed at the Hydraulic Laboratory of the University of Trento, focuses on the experimental determination of the efficiency of small weirs located at the begining of the slabs in reducing the uplift force. This problem is technically relevant because in several cases the above stability criterion imposes exceedingly large slab thickness such that a reduction of the maximum uplift force traduces in a reduction of the slab thickness required to ensure basin stability. Different weir shapes and heights relative to the inflowing water depth have been analyzed measuring the maximum uplift force acting on slabs for different Foude numbers. The research concludes that weirs with height comparable with the inflowing water depth are effective in reducing the maximum uplift force. The research proposes also a simple relationship between the Froude number and a new coefficient, smaller than 1, multiplying the reduction coefficient employed in the criterion for the determination of the slab thickness. The first part of this research were conducted in cooperation with Virgilio Fiorotto from the University of Trieste.

Teaching activity

 

Hydrology; Graduate Program in Environmental and Land Development Engineering

Water Resources Management; Graduate Program in Environmental and Land Development Engineering

Water Resources Management; Undergraduate  Program in Environmental and Land Development Engineering

Geostatistics; PhD  Program in Environmental  Engineering

Groundwater Remediation;   (Seminar) Graduate Program in Environmental and Land Development Engineering

 

Publications

 

The complete list of publications is available on Polaris website

Thesis

 

Software

SYNTHETIC GENERATION OF RANDOM SPACE FUNCTIONS

The availability of fast and accurate generators for random fields with correlated properties is crucial in addressing numerically several geophysical phenomena as solute transport in subsurface environments . This research aims at developing a methodology that uses a geostatistical approach to generate unconditional and conditional to measurements Random Space Functions. The methodology is organized in an efficient algorithm that minimizes the computation cost associated with the generation of many realizations of conditional or unconditional RSFs. The methodology is accurate and efficient in reproducing a large variety of RSFs showing single or evolving scale properties. The proposed algorithm is organized in a computer code available via ftp and named Hydro_gen. Downloading instructions as well as a brief description of the program can be obtained clicking on: HYDRO_GEN. This research has been developed in cooperation with Yoram Rubin, University of California, Berkeley.